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Tobacco Action Plan

The top 5 priorities

  1. Create One National Campaign: One Logo/Name and Message
  2. Develop Clearinghouse on LGBT Tobacco Efforts
  3. Identify Data Sets for Analysis and Conduct New Research
  4. Enhance Connectivity with Larger Anti-Smoking Organizations
  5. Build Resources for Development Programs and Initiatives

see full action plan (PDF)

Resource Library

Surveillance

  • A Blueprint for Meeting LGBT health and Human Services Needs in NYS

    Frazer and Warren, 2010

    Estimates of the size of the LGBT population in New York State vary. In 2004, the New York State Department of Health’s Adult Tobacco Survey included questions on sexual orientation and gender identity. It suggested that 2.6% of adults in New York State are lesbian, gay or bisexual, while 2.1% are transgender. In 2007, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Community Health Survey estimated that 4.1% of people in New York City identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual; however, this survey did not ask about transgender identities. National estimates suggest that 4.1% of the population identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual. However, a larger number have had sex with someone of the same gender or experience same-sex attractions.

    view link | download file
  • Adding Sexual Orientation Questions to Statewide Public Health Surveillance: New Mexico's Experience

    Authors: Vankim NA, Padilla JL, Lee JG, Goldstein AO.

    By Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health

    Abstract

    We examined refusal rates for sensitive demographic questions to determine whether questions on sexual orientation are too sensitive for routine use on public health surveys. We compared the percentage of active refusals in New Mexico for a sexual orientation question and 6 other sensitive demographic questions. In 2007 and 2008, refusal rates for sexual orientation questions were similar to rates for questions on race/ethnicity and weight and significantly lower than rates for questions on household income. Perceptions that sexual orientation is too controversial a topic to be included on state surveys may be unfounded. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 21, 2010: e8-e12. doi:10. 2105/AJPH.2009.186270).



    view link
  • American Lung Association's Smoking Out a Deadly Threat: Tobacco Use in the LGBT Community

    The American Lung Association's latest health disparity report, Smoking Out a Deadly Threat: Tobacco Use in the LGBT Community, examines the trend of higher tobacco use among the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community and the need for additional research specific to this community.

    download file
  • Attitudes Toward Tobacco Use and Clean Air Advocacy in the LGBT Communities of Monroe and Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Caroline Cottingham
    Roger Schimberg, MPH
    24 August 2010

    The data from this study offered information which will hopefully help to improve public health campaigns for tobacco cessation and campaigns for Clean Air acts. Participants in the focus groups in Baton Rouge and Monroe, Louisiana, offered a wealth of responses on why they believe LGBT individuals use tobacco and methods which can help them quit. Unfortunately, the participants‟ responses to basic knowledge questions about tobacco use in the LGBT community, tobacco company targeting, and cessation resources suggests there may be a lack of education concerning the high rates of LGBT tobacco use, the way tobacco companies target LGBT people, and how to find resources to help themselves and/or other LGBT smokers quit. Participants also offered reasons why they support Clean Air acts and barriers to supporting these regulations on tobacco use, along with reasons why they would advocate for Clean Air acts and barriers to advocacy. Coupled with the marketing survey, which offered data on how participants receive information about the LGBT community, this information may help campaigns looking to build support and increase advocacy to pass more regulations on tobacco use in the state of Louisiana. Though some barriers must be addressed, data from the focus groups suggested that most participants already supported these laws, though they did not have the means to advocate for the laws.

    Though research on tobacco use in the LGBT community has increased exponentially over the past ten years, many gaps still remain. More research would be helpful in providing comparisons between states and national LGBT tobacco use data. The narrow focus and sample of this study unfortunately limits this data, but comparisons between other state-focused studies suggests that some of the trends identified in this report may apply to more than simply Baton Rouge and Monroe, Louisiana. This study will be most helpful in addressing the direct tobacco cessation and Clean Air advocacy needs of these cities, though more research might show that this data could be used to inform tobacco cessation programs and Clean Air advocacy in other Louisiana cities and possibly other states.

    download file
  • Best Practices for Asking Questions about Sexual Orientation on Surveys

    Created by the Sexual Minority Assessment Research Team (SMART), a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration

    November 2009

    In 2003 the Ford Foundation began funding a multi-year project that sought to increase the quantity and quality of data on gay, lesbian, and bisexual people, and, by extension, on heterosexual people. Over a five-year period, many researchers participated in the expert panel funded by he grant, thus contributing to the knowledge embodied in this report. This multidisciplinary expert panel pooled decades of knowledge and experience, conducted new methodological research, and met with many survey specialists to identify the best scientific approaches to gathering data on sexual orientation. This panel, known collectively as the Sexual Minority Assessment Research Team (SMART), met regularly to discuss these data issues. By “sexual minority,” we mean people who are attracted to or have had experience with same-sex sex partners, or someone who identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual.

    This document is the culmination of the work of this expert panel.

    download file
  • California - Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transgender Tobacco Use Survey 2004

    California Department of Health Services
    Tobacco Control Section


    In 2003-04, Field Research Corporation conducted a statewide household survey of the California lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population for the Tobacco Control Section (TCS), Department of Health Services (DHS). The purpose was to assess tobacco-related behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge within the LGBT population; identify disparities between the LGBT and general adult populations of the State; and explore possible explanations for the most important differences.


    Prepared by
    Field Research Corporation

    The Tobacco Control Section
    Cancer Control Branch
    Division of Chronic Disease and Injury Control
    California Department of Health Services
    1616 Capitol Avenue, Suite 74.516
    MS 7206
    P.O. Box 997413
    Sacramento, CA 95899-7413

    Suggested citation:
    Bye L, Gruskin E, Greenwood, G, Albright V, Krotki K. California Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgender (LGBT) Tobacco Use Survey – 2004. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Health Services, 2005.

    download file
  • CDC Mortality and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)
    Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2011

    The Network worked to include LGBT people in this report, however with little data, there was barely mention of LGBTs. However, CDC is calling for LGBT data collection, and hopefully policy makers will follow suit.

    view link | download file
  • Coming Out about Smoking: Tobacco Use in the LGBTQ Young Adult Community

    NYAC has long been the go to group for some great resources for pushing back against LGBTQ youth tobacco use, and they've done it again here. Please take a gander at their fascinating new report on LGBTQ youth tobacco attitudes, complete with smart and savvy recommendations. There's lots to learn from in this report. Two things I found especially fascinating were that 20% of people who said they were 'nonsmokers' admitted to smoking socially; and that only 63% of LGBTQ youth said their sexual orientation was LGB (I know at least a dozen survey researchers who'll wail and gnash their teeth at this news). But mostly, let's get this out far and wide, because LGBTQ youth tobacco control is severely underfunded and powered. Unless we want to be doing this work in 20 more years, please help us spread these findings and strategies to all the groups that can make them happen. Great job NYAC!

    view link | download file
  • Final Report Sexual Identity Design October 2011, Development and Testing of the NHIS Sexual Identity Question

    Kristen Miller
    J. Michael Ryan
    Questionnaire Design Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Methodology, National Center for Health Statistics
    October 2011


    This report describes research to develop and evaluate a sexual identity question for the National Health Interview Survey. Development and then evaluation of the question is based on findings from cognitive testing studies conducted by the Questionnaire Design Research Laboratory (QDRL), specifically, 7 previous testing projects as well as this current study which, taken together, consisted of a total of 386 in-depth cognitive interviews.

    download file
  • Georgia Tobacco Survey 2012

    The Atlanta Lesbian Health Initiative is conducting research related to tobacco use in the LGBTQ community in Georgia as part of an effort to better understand the health needs of the LGBTQ community. This survey will add to our understanding of the needs of the LGBTQ community in terms of tobacco use and tobacco-related illness, and will help us develop programs for our community in the future.

    download file
  • Healthy People 2020 Bisexual People Fact Sheet

    Healthy People 2020 Bisexual People Fact Sheet

    http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/default.aspx

    download file
  • Healthy People 2020 Gay Men's Fact Sheet

    Healthy People 2020 Gay Men's Fact Sheet

    http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/default.aspx

    download file
  • Healthy People 2020 Lesbian Factsheet

    Healthy People 2020 Lesbian Factsheet

    http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/default.aspx

    download file
  • Healthy People 2020 Transgender Fact Sheet

    Healthy People 2020 Transgender Fact Sheet

    http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/default.aspx

    download file
  • How many people are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender?

    by Gary J. Gates, Williams Distinguished Scholar

    The Williams Institute

    April 2011



    Executive Summary

    Increasing numbers of population-based surveys in the United States and across the world include questions that allow for an estimate of the size of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population. This research brief discusses challenges associated with collecting better information about the LGBT community and reviews eleven recent US and international surveys that ask sexual orientation or gender identity questions. The brief concludes with estimates of the size of the LGBT population in the United States.

    Key findings from the research brief are as follows:

    *An estimated 3.5% of adults in the United States identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual and an estimated 0.3% of adults are transgender.

    *This implies that there are approximately 9 million LGBT Americans, a figure roughly equivalent to the population of New Jersey.

    *Among adults who identify as LGB, bisexuals comprise a slight majority (1.8% compared to 1.7% who identify as lesbian or gay).

    *Women are substantially more likely than men to identify as bisexual. Bisexuals comprise more than half of the lesbian and bisexual population among women in eight of the nine surveys considered in the brief. Conversely, gay men comprise substantially more than half of gay and bisexual men in seven of the nine surveys.

    *Estimates of those who report any lifetime same-sex sexual behavior and any same-sex sexual attraction are substantially higher than estimates of those who identify as LGB. An estimated 19 million Americans (8.2%) report that they have engaged in same-sex sexual behavior and nearly 25.6 million Americans (11%) acknowledge at least some same-sex sexual attraction.

    *Understanding the size of the LGBT population is a critical first step to informing a host of public policy and research topics. The surveys highlighted in this report demonstrate the viability of sexual orientation and gender identity questions on large national population-based surveys. Adding these questions to more national, state, and local data sources is critical to developing research that enables a better understanding of the understudied LGBT community.

    view link | download file
  • Idaho Tobacco Prevention and Control Program

    LGBT Health Assessment Survey

    Final Survey Report 2004

    During the Spring of 2003, the Idaho Tobacco Prevention and Control Program (TPCP) contracted with United Vision for Idaho (UVI) to conduct a statewide survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals to assess the impact of tobacco use within this community. In addition to asking about tobacco-use related behaviors, the survey collected data on a wide range of health-related issues that are of concern to the LGBT community at large.

    download file
  • Joint Statement on Data Collection: Gaps and Best Practices Series

    Statement from the National Networks on the gaps and best practices for data collection of minority populations

    This statement was sent to NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins and Center for Tobacco Products, Dr. Lawrence Deyton.

    Suggestions for Best Practices include:
    *Routine demographic measures for sexual and gender minorities, per IOM recommendations.
    *Disaggregated data collection for racial and ethnic categories, per IOM recommendations.
    *Respondent reported data collection, versus interviewer determined, particularly for race, ethnicity, and sex.
    *In language data collection, especially for Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders.
    *Adequate low socio-economic indicators, particularly parental proxy indicators if it is a youth sample.

    October 14th, 2011

    download file
  • LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, AND TRANSGENDER (LGBT) COMMUNITIES AND SMOKING

    Legacy for Health Factsheet on LGBT Smoking

    March 2011

    About:
    The prevalence of tobacco use among LGBT populations has not been adequately examined as national and most state surveys on tobacco lack questions about sexual orientation and gender identity. Further research is needed to understand the prevalence of tobacco use and the risk factors that influence LGBT smoking behavior, in particular in the transgender community.

    view link | download file
  • LGBT Companion Document to HP 2020

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services took an important step as they unveiled Healthy People 2020 (HP2020), the blueprint for national public health prevention and policy goals for the next decade. For the first time LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) health is recognized and there is clear acknowledgement that LGBT individuals experience health disparities that affect their health status.

    view link | download file
  • LGBT People and Tobacco Fact Sheet (2011)

    Updated in October 2011 by Joseph Lee
    Based off our 2008

    This document provides facts on:

    *LGBT communities are severely impacted by tobacco use

    *Tobacco companies target LGBT populations, compromising work against a major health threat

    *Negative health impacts of tobacco continue to be under-estimated

    *Reasons for the disparity

    *LGBT people want clean indoor air

    download file
  • LGBT Surveillance and Data Collection Briefing Paper

    A briefing paper on capturing LGBT data, with an emphasis on tobacco. This paper discusses which questions have been tested and why it is important to collect this data.

    download file
  • Moving Forward with LGBT Health: First Steps for the Federal Government

    Network publication looking at federal need to address LGBT health disparities via data collection for instance.

    download file
  • National Lesbian Health Care Survey: Implications for Mental Health Care

    J Consult Clin Psychol. 1994 Apr;62(2):228-42.

    Bradford J, Ryan C, Rothblum ED.
    Center for Public Service, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23284.

    Abstract
    This article presents demographic, lifestyle, and mental health information about 1,925 lesbians from all 50 states who participated as respondents in the National Lesbian Health Care Survey (1984-1985), the most comprehensive study on U.S. lesbians to date. Over half the sample had had thoughts about suicide at some time, and 18% had attempted suicide. Thirty-seven percent had been physically abused as a child or adult, 32% had been raped or sexually attacked, and 19% had been involved in incestuous relationships while growing up. Almost one third used tobacco on a daily basis, and about 30% drank alcohol more than once a week, 6% daily. About three fourths had received counseling at some time, and half had done so for reasons of sadness and depression. Lesbians in the survey also were socially connected and had a variety of social supports, mostly within the lesbian community. However, few had come out to all family members and coworkers. Level of openness about lesbianism was associated with less fear of exposure and with more choices about mental health counseling.

    view link | download file
  • National Network Consortium Disparity Letters to Drs Collins and Deyton

    October 11, 2011
    Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. Director, National Institutes of Health One Center Drive, Building One, Room 126
    Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0148

    Lawrence Deyton, M.S.P.H., M.D. Director, Center for Tobacco Products U.S. Food and Drug Administration
    9200 Corporate Boulevard, Room 110H Rockville, MD 20850-322

    download file
  • New Mexico’s Progress in Collecting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Data and Its Implications for Addressing Health Disparities

    First report in New Mexico to examine numerous health indicators by sexual orientation. Compared to straight adults, LGB adults have significantly increased rates of tobacco use, excessive alcohol use, suicidal attempts and ideation, depression, intimate partner violence, obesity, asthma, and life dissatisfaction. However, LGB adults are more likely than straight adults to report engaging in sufficient physical activity and having had an HIV test. These data provide new insight into health inequities between LGB and straight adults and are essential in prioritizing and allocating resources to address the health of LGB communities.

    download file
  • Perceived risk for cancer in an urban sexual minority

    Burkhalter JE, Hay JL, Coups E, Warren B, Li Y, Ostroff JS. Perceived risk for cancer in an urban sexual minority. J Behav Med. 2010 Sep 25.


    Abstract
    Lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals are a sexual minority experiencing elevated cancer risk factors and health disaparites, e.g., elevated tobacco use, disproportionate rates of infection with human immunodeficiency virus. Little attention has been paid to cancer prevention, education, and control in sexual minorities. This study describes cancer risk perceptions and their correlates so as to generate testable hypotheses and provide a foundation for targeting cancer prevention and risk reduction efforts in this high risk population. A cross-sectional survey of affiliates of a large urban community center serving sexual minority persons yielded a study sample of 247 anonymous persons. The survey assessed demographics, absolute perceived cancer risk, cancer risk behaviors, desired lifestyle changes to reduce cancer risk, and psychosocial variables including stress, depression, and stigma. Univariate and multivariate nonparametric statistics were used for analyses. The sample was primarily white non-Hispanic, middle-aged, and > 80% had at least a high school education. Mean values for absolute perceived cancer risk (range 0-100% risk), were 43.0 (SD = 25.4) for females, and for males, 49.3 (SD = 24.3). For females, although the multivariate regression model for absolute perceived cancer risk was statistically significant (P < .05), no single model variable was significant. For men, the multivariate regression model was significant (P < .001), with endorsement of "don't smoke/quit smoking" to reduce personal cancer risk (P < .001), and greater number of sexual partners (P = .054), positively associated with absolute perceived risk for cancer. This study provides novel data on cancer risk perceptions in sexual minorities, identifying correlates of absolute perceived cancer risk for each gender and several potential foci for cancer prevention interventions with this at-risk group.


    view link
  • Recommendations for Inclusive Data Collection of Trans People in HIV Prevention, Care, and Services

    The two page short version from the Center of Excellence for Transgender HIV Prevention's "Recommendations for Inclusive Data Collection of Trans People in HIV Prevention, Care, and Services" examines the issue of reliable inclusion of the transgender population in HIV data collection. Topics include questions to ask, helpful implementation of data collection, and resource assistance.

    download file
  • Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12 -- Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance, Selected Sites, United States, 2001-2009 (CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), June 6th, 2011)

    Laura Kann, PhD
    Emily O'Malley Olsen, MSPH
    Tim McManus, MS
    Steve Kinchen
    David Chyen, MS
    William A. Harris, MM
    Howell Wechsler, EdD

    Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

    Problem: Sexual minority youths are youths who identify themselves as gay or lesbian, bisexual, or unsure of their sexual identity or youths who have only had sexual contact with persons of the same sex or with both sexes. Population-based data on the healthrisk behaviors practiced by sexual minority youths are needed at the state and local levels to most effectively monitor and ensure the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to address the needs of this population.

    Reporting Period Covered: January 2001-June 2009

    Description of the System: The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors priority health-risk behaviors (behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries, behaviors that contribute to violence, behaviors related to attempted suicide, tobacco use, alcohol use, other drug use, sexual behaviors, dietary behaviors, physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and weight management) and the prevalence of obesity and asthma among youths and young adults. YRBSS includes state and local schoolbased Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBSs) conducted by state and local education and health agencies. This report summarizes results from YRBSs conducted during 2001–2009 in seven states and six large urban school districts that included questions on sexual identity (i.e., heterosexual, gay or lesbian, bisexual, or unsure), sex of sexual contacts (i.e., same sex only, opposite sex only, or both sexes), or both of these variables. The surveys were conducted among large population-based samples of public school students in grades 9-12.

    Interpretation: Sexual minority students, particularly gay, lesbian, and bisexual students and students who had sexual contact with both sexes, are more likely to engage in health-risk behaviors than other students.

    Public Health Action: Effective state and local public health and school health policies and practices should be developed to help reduce the prevalence of health-risk behaviors and improve health outcomes among sexual minority youths. In addition, more state and local surveys designed to monitor health-risk behaviors and selected health outcomes among population-based samples of students in grades 9-12 should include questions on sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts.

    view link | download file
  • Sexual Orientation on 2009 YRBS

    James F. Bogden of Healthy Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students Project reviewed jurisdictions that asked high school students about same-sex attraction, same-sex sexual behavior, or sexual identity. Here is a map of the limited number states.



    download file
  • Social ecology of tobacco surveillance data for sexual and gender minority populations

    Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Volume 11, Number 7 (July 2009) 908–909

    Joseph Lee

    download file
  • The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding

    Institute of Medicine of the National Academes

    Report Brief
    March 2011

    Report brief discusses the following LGBT health concerns:

    Conducting Research on LGBT Populations

    Implementing a Research Agenda

    LGBT Health Status Throughout the Life Course

    view link | download file
  • Tobacco Use Among Missouri LGBTQ 2009

    The Check-Out Project: An Examination of Smoking and Tobacco Attitudes in the LGBTQ Community in Missouri

    This report identifies significant tobacco-related disparities in Missouri's LGBTQ community and provides a broad description of the LGBTQ community with regards to tobacco issues.

    There is a higher rate of smoking and a lower rate of successful cessation. There is a lower level of knowledge of the harmful effects of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke, and a general lack of awareness of evidence-based cessation treatment options.

    Unfortunately, there is also a significant lack of awareness of the disparities identified in this assessment. The LGBTQ community of Missouri is unaware of these disparities and the health impact of tobacco use.

    download file
  • Trickets and Trash Surveillance Update 2011

    Trinkets & Trash is a surveillance project and archive at the UMDNJ¨C School of Public Health that monitors tobacco industry marketing in magazines, direct mail, e©\mail, websites, and other channels. For more images, visit us online at trinketsandtrash.org.

    If you have examples you¡¯d like to share or would like to be added to our mailing list, e©\mail us at trinketsandtrash@umdnj.edu.


    Discussed in this report are:
    Camel Snus targets NYC smokers

    Camel Switch Challenge 2, Hump Day & Dissolvable Fans

    Newport¡¯s Persistent Ads

    Other Smokeless News.

    view link | download file
  • West Virginia Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Tobacco Survey

    Final Report: August 11, 2010 

    Prepared for: West Virginia Covenant House  

    Prepared by: UNC School of Medicine Tobacco Prevention and Evaluation Program

    This report provides an independent assessment of evidence for a LGB tobacco disparity in WV. This is one of the first and most comprehensive studies of LGB tobacco use in Appalachia.  To identify rates of tobacco use for LGB West Virginians, the UNC Tobacco Prevention and Evaluation Program conducted two pilot surveys of tobacco use in LGB populations at bars and community events.

    view link | download file

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Survey Instrument Examples

  • "Qualitative Investigation of Smokers and Non-Smokers in the LGBT Market" Executive Summary

    Here is a executive summary of a "Qualitative Investigation of Smokers and Non-Smokers in the LGBT Market" by Winston Stuart Associates, LTD. Included is the respondent screener and discussion guides from LGBT focus groups conducted in 2001, smokers and nonsmokers, in Sacramento and San Francisco.


    download file
  • 2005: Follow-up handout on Portland Pride Survey

    Highlights the results of the 2005 Portland Pride survey on smoking in the LGBTQ community, as conducted by Breathefree, Oregon Coalition Against Tobacco and urges action.

    download file
  • 2006: New Mexico Survey Instrument

    Survey instrument
    In June 2006, the New Mexico Department of Health, Stop Tobacco on My People and the University of New Mexico Health Evaluation and Research Team conducted a tobacco survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.
    Report can be found here http://www.lgbttobacco.org/resources.php?ID=17#28

    download file
  • 2006: Oregon Pride Smoking Survey

    Click here to see a copy of the survey given by Breathe Free, the Oregon LGBTQ Coalition against Tobacco, at 2006 Portland Pride.

    download file
  • 2007: Colorado Pride Survey

    Survey regarding behaviors, attitudes and beliefs of the gay, lesbian, bisexual & transgender (GLBT) communities in Colorado regarding tobacco use. The study was conducted by the SmokeFree GLBT task force at Pride in 2007

    download file
  • 2007: Oregon Pride Smoking Survey

    Click here to see a copy of the survey given by Breathe Free, the Oregon LGBTQ Coalition against Tobacco, at 2007 Portland Pride.

    download file
  • 2007: Toronto, Canada Survey Instrument Example

    The Toronto Rainbow Tobacco Survey: A Report on Tobacco Use in Toronto's LGBTTQ Communities.
    Find the report here:
    http://lgbttobacco.org/files/TRTS%20Report.pdf

    download file
  • 2010 West Virginia Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Tobacco Survey

    A copy of the 2010 West Virginia Pride Festival and Bar Survey used by West Virginia Covenant House and the Tobacco Prevention and Evaluation Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    download file
  • A Blueprint for Meeting LGBT health and Human Services Needs in NYS

    Frazer and Warren, 2010

    Estimates of the size of the LGBT population in New York State vary. In 2004, the New York State Department of Health’s Adult Tobacco Survey included questions on sexual orientation and gender identity. It suggested that 2.6% of adults in New York State are lesbian, gay or bisexual, while 2.1% are transgender. In 2007, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Community Health Survey estimated that 4.1% of people in New York City identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual; however, this survey did not ask about transgender identities. National estimates suggest that 4.1% of the population identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual. However, a larger number have had sex with someone of the same gender or experience same-sex attractions.

    view link | download file
  • Aboriginal Two-Spirit and LGBTQ Migration, Mobility, and Health Research Project

    Description

    This qualitative, community-based research project explored the trajectories of migration of Aboriginal people who identify as Two-Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) and the impact of mobility on health and wellness. Our focus on migration included movement from First Nation reserve communities to urban centres or rural communities (and back and forth) as well as staying or moving within one place. We were interested in the intersection between sexual and gender identities with cultural/Nation and other identities within the historical and present context of colonization in Canada.

    More specifically this research project had the following objectives:

    * To explore the migration paths and experiences of Aboriginal Two-Spirit and LGBTQ peoples, their experiences of health/wellness in that context, and their interactions with health and social services (including mainstream, Aboriginal and LGBTQ services).

    * To generate new knowledge that may lead to future research that will be of direct benefit to LGBTQ and Aboriginal communities, Aboriginal service providers and health/social service agencies.

    download file
  • Adding Sexual Orientation Questions to Statewide Public Health Surveillance: New Mexico's Experience

    Authors: Vankim NA, Padilla JL, Lee JG, Goldstein AO.

    By Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health

    Abstract

    We examined refusal rates for sensitive demographic questions to determine whether questions on sexual orientation are too sensitive for routine use on public health surveys. We compared the percentage of active refusals in New Mexico for a sexual orientation question and 6 other sensitive demographic questions. In 2007 and 2008, refusal rates for sexual orientation questions were similar to rates for questions on race/ethnicity and weight and significantly lower than rates for questions on household income. Perceptions that sexual orientation is too controversial a topic to be included on state surveys may be unfounded. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 21, 2010: e8-e12. doi:10. 2105/AJPH.2009.186270).



    view link
  • An Examination of Smoking Behavior and Opinions About Smoke-free Environments in a Large Sample of Sexual and Gender Minority Community Members

    Authors: Jane A. McElroy, Ph.D., Kevin D. Everett, Ph.D. and Isabella Zaniletti, M.A.

    Corresponding Author: Jane A McElroy, Ph.D., Family and Community Medicine Department, University of Missouri, MA 306 Medical Science Building, Columbia, MO 65212, USA. Telephone: 573-882-4993; Fax: 573-884-6172; E-mail: mcelroyja@health.missouri.edu

    Received March 22, 2010.
    Accepted January 24, 2011

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to more completely quantify smoking rate and support for smoke-free policies in private and public environments from a large sample of self-identified sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations.

    Methods: A targeted sampling strategy recruited participants from 4 Missouri Pride Festivals and online surveys targeted to SGM populations during the summer of 2008. A 24-item survey gathered information on gender and sexual orientation, smoking status, and questions assessing behaviors and preferences related to smoke-free policies.

    Results: The project recruited participants through Pride Festivals (n = 2,676) and Web-based surveys (n = 231) representing numerous sexual and gender orientations and the racial composite of the state of Missouri. Differences were found between the Pride Festivals sample and the Web-based sample, including smoking rates, with current smoking for the Web-based sample (22%) significantly less than the Pride Festivals sample (37%; p < .0001). The SGM group (n = 2,162) was 1.49 times more likely to be current smokers compared with the study's heterosexual group (n = 436; p = .005). Statistically fewer SGM racial minorities (33%) are current smokers compared with SGM Whites (37%; p = .04). Support and preferences for public and private smoke-free environments were generally low in the SGM population.

    Conclusions: The strategic targeting method achieved a large and diverse sample. The findings of high rates of smoking coupled with generally low levels of support for smoke-free public policies in the SGM community highlight the need for additional research to inform programmatic attempts to reduce tobacco use and increase support for smoke-free environments.


    view link
  • Attitudes Toward Tobacco Use and Clean Air Advocacy in the LGBT Communities of Monroe and Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Caroline Cottingham
    Roger Schimberg, MPH
    24 August 2010

    The data from this study offered information which will hopefully help to improve public health campaigns for tobacco cessation and campaigns for Clean Air acts. Participants in the focus groups in Baton Rouge and Monroe, Louisiana, offered a wealth of responses on why they believe LGBT individuals use tobacco and methods which can help them quit. Unfortunately, the participants‟ responses to basic knowledge questions about tobacco use in the LGBT community, tobacco company targeting, and cessation resources suggests there may be a lack of education concerning the high rates of LGBT tobacco use, the way tobacco companies target LGBT people, and how to find resources to help themselves and/or other LGBT smokers quit. Participants also offered reasons why they support Clean Air acts and barriers to supporting these regulations on tobacco use, along with reasons why they would advocate for Clean Air acts and barriers to advocacy. Coupled with the marketing survey, which offered data on how participants receive information about the LGBT community, this information may help campaigns looking to build support and increase advocacy to pass more regulations on tobacco use in the state of Louisiana. Though some barriers must be addressed, data from the focus groups suggested that most participants already supported these laws, though they did not have the means to advocate for the laws.

    Though research on tobacco use in the LGBT community has increased exponentially over the past ten years, many gaps still remain. More research would be helpful in providing comparisons between states and national LGBT tobacco use data. The narrow focus and sample of this study unfortunately limits this data, but comparisons between other state-focused studies suggests that some of the trends identified in this report may apply to more than simply Baton Rouge and Monroe, Louisiana. This study will be most helpful in addressing the direct tobacco cessation and Clean Air advocacy needs of these cities, though more research might show that this data could be used to inform tobacco cessation programs and Clean Air advocacy in other Louisiana cities and possibly other states.

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  • Best Practices for Asking Questions about Sexual Orientation on Surveys

    Created by the Sexual Minority Assessment Research Team (SMART), a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration

    November 2009

    In 2003 the Ford Foundation began funding a multi-year project that sought to increase the quantity and quality of data on gay, lesbian, and bisexual people, and, by extension, on heterosexual people. Over a five-year period, many researchers participated in the expert panel funded by he grant, thus contributing to the knowledge embodied in this report. This multidisciplinary expert panel pooled decades of knowledge and experience, conducted new methodological research, and met with many survey specialists to identify the best scientific approaches to gathering data on sexual orientation. This panel, known collectively as the Sexual Minority Assessment Research Team (SMART), met regularly to discuss these data issues. By “sexual minority,” we mean people who are attracted to or have had experience with same-sex sex partners, or someone who identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual.

    This document is the culmination of the work of this expert panel.

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  • Georgia Tobacco Survey 2012

    The Atlanta Lesbian Health Initiative is conducting research related to tobacco use in the LGBTQ community in Georgia as part of an effort to better understand the health needs of the LGBTQ community. This survey will add to our understanding of the needs of the LGBTQ community in terms of tobacco use and tobacco-related illness, and will help us develop programs for our community in the future.

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  • How many people are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender?

    by Gary J. Gates, Williams Distinguished Scholar

    The Williams Institute

    April 2011



    Executive Summary

    Increasing numbers of population-based surveys in the United States and across the world include questions that allow for an estimate of the size of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population. This research brief discusses challenges associated with collecting better information about the LGBT community and reviews eleven recent US and international surveys that ask sexual orientation or gender identity questions. The brief concludes with estimates of the size of the LGBT population in the United States.

    Key findings from the research brief are as follows:

    *An estimated 3.5% of adults in the United States identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual and an estimated 0.3% of adults are transgender.

    *This implies that there are approximately 9 million LGBT Americans, a figure roughly equivalent to the population of New Jersey.

    *Among adults who identify as LGB, bisexuals comprise a slight majority (1.8% compared to 1.7% who identify as lesbian or gay).

    *Women are substantially more likely than men to identify as bisexual. Bisexuals comprise more than half of the lesbian and bisexual population among women in eight of the nine surveys considered in the brief. Conversely, gay men comprise substantially more than half of gay and bisexual men in seven of the nine surveys.

    *Estimates of those who report any lifetime same-sex sexual behavior and any same-sex sexual attraction are substantially higher than estimates of those who identify as LGB. An estimated 19 million Americans (8.2%) report that they have engaged in same-sex sexual behavior and nearly 25.6 million Americans (11%) acknowledge at least some same-sex sexual attraction.

    *Understanding the size of the LGBT population is a critical first step to informing a host of public policy and research topics. The surveys highlighted in this report demonstrate the viability of sexual orientation and gender identity questions on large national population-based surveys. Adding these questions to more national, state, and local data sources is critical to developing research that enables a better understanding of the understudied LGBT community.

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  • Idaho Tobacco Prevention and Control Program

    LGBT Health Assessment Survey

    Final Survey Report 2004

    During the Spring of 2003, the Idaho Tobacco Prevention and Control Program (TPCP) contracted with United Vision for Idaho (UVI) to conduct a statewide survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals to assess the impact of tobacco use within this community. In addition to asking about tobacco-use related behaviors, the survey collected data on a wide range of health-related issues that are of concern to the LGBT community at large.

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  • LGBT HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES EVALUATION TOOLKIT
    2011

    Prepared by
    M. Somjen Frazer
    Cathy Roche &
    Chloe Mirzayi
    Strength In Numbers Consulting Group
    for the AIDS Institute of the New York State Department of Health

    This Indicator Workbook is designed to provide you with a starting toolkit for evaluating some of the aspects of your program that may be difficult to measure. This workbook
    provides sample survey scales for indicators from four main categories defined in detail below: health, social support, self-efficacy, and cultural competency. In addition, we provide samples of survey "nuts and bolts," the basic information you should include in any survey.

    Citation: Frazer, M. Somjen, Roche, Cathy and Mirzayi, Chloe. (2011). LGBT Health and Human Services Evaluation Toolkit. Strength In Numbers Consulting Group for the AIDS Institute of the New York State Department of Health: Brooklyn, NY and Albany, NY

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  • National Transgender Discrimination Survey Report on Health and Health Care

    Findings of a Study by the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
    By Jaime M. Grant, Ph.D., Lisa A. Mottet, J.D., and Justin Tanis, D.Min.
    With Jody L. Herman, Ph.D., Jack Harrison, and Mara Keisling
    October 2010

    This survey examines Access to Care, HIV/STD prevelance, substance and alcohol use, suicidal ideation and topics surrounding gender transition.

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  • Ohio Department of Health Focus Group Survey

    The Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Health Promotion and Risk Reduction- Tobacco Risk Reduction Program conducted focus groups to learn about the unique cultural issues associated with tobacco use prevention around the state of Ohio. These are the questions asked during the focus group.
    These results form the focus groups can be found in the report "2005-06 Voices of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender on: Tobacco Use, Tobacco Control, and the Effects of Tobacco." which can be found at:

    http://lgbttobacco.org/files/OH%20LGBT%20Report.pdf

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  • Ohio's LGBT Focus Group Transcript
    July 2006

    The Institute for Local Government Administration and Rural Development (ILGARD), part of Ohio University’s Voinovich Center for Leadership and Public Affairs, gathered data through focus group discussions on the awareness, experience, and perspective of 13 population groups about tobacco use and prevention. The focus group transcripts for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender follows. This project was funded by the Ohio Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reports on the
    findings are available through the Ohio Department of Health.

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